St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman St Augustine bail bonds St Johns County bail bondsman Marion County bail bonds Marion County bail bondsman Marion County bail bonds Marion County bail bondsman Marion County bail bonds Marion County bail bondsman bail bondsman  bail bondsman
bail bondsman
bail bondsman
 bail bondsman
bail bondsman
Marion County bail bonds Marion County bail bondsman
bail bondsman
bail bondsman
 bail bondsman
 bail bondsman
 bail bondsman
 bail bondsman

Brevard County Bail Bonds
Marion County's Leading Bail Bondsman Call Now and get out of Jail fast

Active Warrants and Walk-Throughs

If you have an active warrant in South Florida, Marion County Bail Bonds can assist you in having that cleared. You can check for warrants that have been issued through the any Marion County Florida Sheriff’s Department by following the links on our Web Links page. In order have an active warrant lifted, the accused must appear at the jail for a self surrender. This is called a Walk Through, when you turn yourself in with a bondsman there to post a bond so your stay is as short as possible.

A representative from our bail bonds office will accompany you to the jail where we will go to the bonding desk to begin the walk-through. The officer will check for active warrants in both FCIC and NCIC (the florida Crime Information Center and National Crime Information Center). Once a warrant is found you are considered in custody while the officer waits for confirmation from the originating agency.

During the walk through, the officer will be asking you questions about your personal information, taking your fingerprints and booking photos. Once the warrant has been verified, the officer will accept our bond and lift the warrant out of the system. You will be given a copy of your bond that contains your first court date. It is important to keep this copy for your records and bring it with you when appearing in court.

There are a few potential differences between getting bail for a warrant of arrest and getting out of jail after getting arrested. A warrant of arrest can occur in a couple of situations and basically means you've either ignored or forgotten a court hearing or you are eluding police on a more serious offense. It's important to understand the differences between the two so you can make the best decision.

Difference Between Warrant of Arrest and Arrest

The key difference between the two has to do with the number of times you are involved with the legal system. A good rule of thumb is that the more times you are involved with the legal system, the more severe any punishment and the higher any bail amounts are likely to be. So if you are drinking while driving, that's a serious offense that will often require bail. Part of the bail procedure includes your promise to show up on court on hearings related to that offense. When you don't - no matter the reason - a warrant of arrest will be issued. Since this will now be at least your second involvement with the legal system, the amount of the bail the second time around will almost always be much, much higher.

Two Types of Warrant of Arrest

  • Bench warrant. This is usually issued by a judge when you don't show up for a court hearing on a particular matter, whether it is a misdemeanor or felony. The bench warrant is distributed throughout the area and local police will arrest you as soon as they see you. Getting arrested for a bench warrant, because it is another involvement with the legal system, can often lead to the loss of a driver's license or even being held without the benefit of bail. The decision to hold someone without bail usually only occurs if the offense was very serious or if additional warrants are discovered on your record.
  • Warrant of arrest. A warrant of arrest simply means that you have not yet been taken into custody on an outstanding arrest warrant. Sometimes, you can be identified as a potential criminal in a case and you are not aware there is a warrant for your arrest. There may be no particular repercussions when you are eventually arrested. However, if you are actively eluding police, that could lead to a much higher bail amount or even confinement without bail.

(1589 reads)

Marion County Bail Bonds

Website Design and Development by Artastic.com